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Acrea Tiger Moth
Saltmarsh Caterpillar

Estigmene acrea



One day I found this pretty moth in my garden.  I put it in a jar to show to the grand kids.  While in captivity she laid eggs on a leaf.  So the kids got to watch the caterpillars hatch, grow, spin cocoons, and emerge as adults.

Acrea Tiger Moth, Estigmene acrea   Acrea tiger moth as if she landed on the outside of your window.








Acrea Tiger Moth, Estigmene acrea The more likely view of the moth.  Since they are night flyers, they can be easily handled during the day.  Before they can take off, they must flutter their wings until their flight muscles warm up to operating temperature.  So you have warning in case you want to keep them captive.





Acrea Tiger Moth, Estigmene acrea This view shows the orange color of the upper legs.








Acrea Tiger Moth, Estigmene acrea This is the egg mass glued to the under side of a mint leaf.

 
 
 
 
 
       

Acrea Tiger Moth, Estigmene acrea Here is a woollybear caterpillar.  It is commonly called a saltmarsh caterpillar.







Acrea Tiger Moth, Estigmene acrea Sometimes the caterpillars have silvery hair instead of black.  It may change color between instars (when the skin is shed to permit growth).







Acrea Tiger Moth, Estigmene acrea Moths, not butterflies, spin cocoons.  These moths usually cover the cocoon completely with curled leaves, so they would be very difficult to locate in the wild.







[Taxonomy : Classification ]
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